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    January 2019

    Teaching Kids to Ski – Part 3: Tree Skiing

    *This is Part Three of our Family Ski Series. Read Part One for more information on how to share your love of skiing with the next generation, Part Two for tips on little drops, or Part Four for tips on how to send it.

    Raised by the Mountains

    Do you want to share your love of the mountains with your children? Teach them to ski with passion as much as skill? Follow along with @chrislennonski and @sastrugi_gill  in this five part series as they share some of the tactics they use to raise mountain kids in a skiing family. Written by Chris Lennon: freeskier, writer and grom Sherpa living in Squamish British Columbia. for tips on how to send it

     

    Ski tip 3: Tree Skiing

    Sometimes there is nothing better than simply saying “follow me,” and leading the youngster down a route choice they would not take themselves to get them out of their usual habits and expand their abilities.

    1.  Push their limits on speed/line.  My daughter would have no difficulty getting down this slope but the goal here was to get her making bigger turns and skiing faster, using the shape of the bumps to link her turns.
    2. Set the tracks. By following the track I set she is forced to ski through the trough between bumps and carry more momentum than she may have opted for herself.
    3. Lead them down challenging terrain. This leads her into and over the biggest part of the next bump and hopefully sets her up to turn down the backside of the bump as she continues to follow my route selection.
    4. Allow them to follow you… and their instincts. Given the goal of simply following me, she also doesn’t need to think about route selection, which is a good way to get her to let her skis run a bit more.

    See the slideshow below for these steps in action.

    1/4

    My daughter would have no difficulty getting down this slope but the goal here was to get her making bigger turns and skiing faster, using the shape of the bumps to link her turns.
    Photo credit: Gillian Morgan @sastrugi_gill
    Snow credit: Whistler Blackcomb

    2/4

    By following the track I set she is forced to ski through the trough between bumps and carry more momentum than she may have opted for herself.
    Photo credit: Gillian Morgan @sastrugi_gill
    Snow credit: Whistler Blackcomb

    3/4

    This leads her into and over the biggest part of the next bump and hopefully sets her up to turn down the backside of the bump as she continues to follow my route selection.
    Photo credit: Gillian Morgan @sastrugi_gill
    Snow credit: Whistler Blackcomb

    4/4

    Given the goal of simply following me, she also doesn’t need to think about route selection, which is a good way to get her to let her skis run a bit more.
    Photo credit: Gillian Morgan @sastrugi_gill
    Snow credit: Whistler Blackcomb

    Read Tip 1: Learning to Air Turn. Tip 2: Little Drops. or check in later for Round 4 of Family Ski Tips!

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